03 May 2021

Q&A Call-Career Mobility

Dani Johnson
Co-founder & Principal Analyst

TL;DR

  • In this Q&A call Dani Johnson discusses our research on career mobility
  • Mobility is a mindset about exploration and opportunity that’s reshaping the relationship between orgs and employees
  • Employees have shifted to this new mindset, but managers tend to have a harder time because of talent hoarding
  • How is mobility changing in orgs and what are the trends that we are seeing
  • Find out the importance to aligning goals by using the 5 approaches to mobility
  • COVID has fundamentally changed the way that we’ve addressed mobility, and will continue to mold it and modify as we keep going

TRANSCRIPT

Introduction

Dani Johnson:
Okay. I think we are going to get started. So again, my name is Dani Johnson. I'm a co-founder and principal analyst at RedThread Research. And we started looking at mobility years and years and years ago. But about six months ago we got into it pretty deeply. We did a lit review, we did a few roundtables and we wrote up kind of what we found on career mobility. It's changed drastically in the last little while, and it turns out that there are different ways to do it depending on kind of what you're trying to get done. So we're going to start with just a very, very brief overview of some of the things that we found in the research, and then we'll get to the questions that you all have. And the questions that were submitted beforehand for the people that will be watching this later. So with that, let's just start with who we are. We are Redthread Research. We do research on all kinds of things, human and capital. We also do some advisory work and some education, and we have a brand new membership for those that are interested in looking at our other research, the areas that we cover, are people, analytics, learning, and skills performance employee experience. We're doing a lot of work right now on DEIB. And then we cover the HR technology space pretty well.

What is Mobility?

Dani Johnson:
So let's start with what mobility is and what mobility isn't. Years ago and for a really long time up until fairly recently, we've thought about mobility as moving a person from one job to another job. And in some of the interviews that we conducted, we also found that mobility also meant moving a person from one location to another location. So it's basically a way to relocate skills within your organization, whether that's physically or whether that's changing a job role. A lot of it had to do about the movement itself. And what we found was recently, particularly with COVID, it it's much more about mindset. So one of the biggest things that we've found is that mobility is now a mindset it's about enabling opportunities. So employees can participate in opportunities that benefit both themselves in their own careers, as well as the organization to get the organization where it needs to go.

Dani Johnson:
The second thing we found, and this has been percolating for some years, is organizations and employees are starting to think beyond roles. So instead of just moving a person into a new role, employees are often taking on and have the opportunity to take on part-time or gig work at the side of their day job. So that they can develop the skills that they want and going the direction that they want and develop the networks that they want. So it's not just about moving from one role to another anymore. It's a lot about part-time work or gig work or a side job on top of what they're already doing. And then the final thing that we found is that it's really important to provide freedom for growth. That's one of the main reasons that organizations are investing in this employees are given the flexibility to experiment and to learn and to grow.

Dani Johnson:
And that's part of the larger employee experience discussion that that tends to be going on. So that's how we think about mindset these days. It's not so much about moving from one role to another, although that still can be a part of it in a lot of organizations, it's much more about the mindset that we have about our careers and about the careers of our employees within those organizations.

Main approaches to mobility

Dani Johnson:
What we found as we talked to all these people and did all of the research, we found that there are basically five main approaches to addressing mobility. The first one is Ladder. This one has been around since the industrial revolution and probably way before that. This one involves employees moving from one role to the next. It generally goes in an upward direction and it's generally within a silo or a function.

Dani Johnson:
So some organizations work really well with the ladder structure. It works for them as they are trying to build expertise. It's by no means an outdated model. It's just the most traditional and the oldest model. The second one that we've been talking about for the last 15 years or so is this idea of a Lattice. Employees can move up and around and down and sometimes inside and outside of the organization, depending on the needs of the organization, as well as depending on the desires of the individual. This was put in place to help with the fact that that the organizations have to respond more quickly to their environments, but also because employees are gaining and expecting more freedom within that organization to move around and see what they want. The third one is Agency. This has been around for a while as well, mostly in professional services firms and creative firms, but we're seeing it sort of expand to other types of organizations as well.

Dani Johnson:
And this is where some of the gig work and the jobs, some of those smaller jobs come into place. In this one when employees move around the organization based on their skills and their knowledge and their preference. So really good example of this is I worked for Deloitte for five or six years. And while I was in Deloitte, there wasn't necessarily a very strong path upward. It was much more about developing the skills that you want and the networks that you want so that you can move around and use those skills and develop new skills in gigs. So I was with you know, people are with the project for a small amount of time, and then they move on to another project based on what they want as well as what the organization needs for those skills. The fourth one is Outside in. Workers with specific skills are brought into the organization to accomplish certain projects or pieces of work.

Dani Johnson:
We are seeing this more, as organizations are trying to develop the skills internally while still maintaining momentum. So they'll go out and purchase skills or bring people in for contracts to do specific things as they are developing the skills internally to move out. And then finally Reset, and this is one that sort of sits across all of them, and I'll show you a picture in a minute that describes that. But employees are re-skilled and deployed into new roles based on the organization's needs and strategies. So when COVID hit a whole bunch of people on the frontline, for example, were in the retail stores and since retail stores shut down, many companies found a way to use those reskill the retail workers had in other parts of the organization. So they noticed that their call centers, for example, the calls coming into their call centers went way up and they realized that the skills that the retail folks had could very easily translate to a different part of the organization.

Dani Johnson:
So they upskilled them a little bit and were able to use them across both. So those are the five main approaches to mobility.

Dani Johnson:
And now we're going to go into your questions. So some of the questions that came in will help us walk through some of the rest of the research.

How is mobility changing in orgs and what are the trends that you're seeing?

Dani Johnson:
So the first question is how is mobility changing in organizations and what are the trends that you're seeing? That is a fantastic question. And it actually ended up being part of the report that we wrote. So there are basically five mobility trends. The first one is that we're seeing much more experimentation people aren't as afraid to try things. And I think that is, again, a product of the COVID mess, I guess, that we find ourselves in, but organizations really are embracing new ways of supporting mobility, especially mobility, the way that we've defined it, which is more of a mindset then than the physical movement from one role to another.

Dani Johnson:
The second thing that we've heard a lot is the talk of leveling, the playing field. And so we've done some research on the DEIB and one of the biggest pieces of research in there that's really sort of hit me is that movement within organizations is based on the networks that you have. And if you don't have the right networks, then you're missing key information that isn't written down anywhere, and that you may not know, that may prevent you from moving from one place to another. And so there's a lot of talk about using mobility. You know, leaders are talking about using mobility to open up more opportunities to more people they're making that more transparent. And again, this has been accelerated by COVID because we'd had to write a bunch of things down because not everybody is sitting in the same place anymore. But mobility is really being used as a way to develop skills and provide people opportunities to develop networks that they hadn't had before.

Dani Johnson:
We love that. The third one is that there are more opportunities for employees period. So before you used to have to be tapped on the shoulder and told that you're in a leadership program to move up in the organization with some of the focus that organizations are putting on developing skills and tracking some of those skills and at least keeping a better sense of what people can do. There are more opportunities open to employees. Not only that there's more transparency with respect to the roles that are available within the organization, both those permanent roles, the more traditional ones, as well as the gig work. So a lot of people are putting into place talent marketplaces, for example, that are really helping people find things that they're interested in and also helping work get done that may have previously been outsourced. There's more data, which means that there are better decisions.

Dani Johnson:
This goes back to some of the things that we were talking about, the project marketplace, keeping better track of skills, keeping better track of employees and what they want, period. More data about employees capabilities can help orgs make better decisions about mobility within their organization. So succession planning has changed. It's no longer about a succession pipeline where you're putting somebody in at the bottom and they pop out the top. It's much more likely that somebody in a completely different part of the organization can move into a role in another part of the organization because of the skills that they have and the visibility that the organization has with respect to those skills. And then finally, and this kind of goes through the last three that we've talked about, tech enablement. There's been an uptick in the number of skills and the sophistication of mobility tech offerings.

Dani Johnson:
So last summer, when COVID hit, we had five vendors within a five week period say, Hey, we really want to show you what we're thinking about with respect to mobility. And so COVID definitely accelerated it, but obviously technology doesn't appear overnight. So those companies had been thinking about it for quite a while, and it, it all just sort of got accelerated with, with the COVID thing. So there's much more tech available to help organizations implement mobility in much more interesting ways. So again, as we go through this, please feel free to type in any questions as we go through. I'm going to go onto the next one, but we can always come back and address some of these trends if you have specific questions related to them.

What is the main reason orgs are thinking about mobility?

Dani Johnson:
The second question we got is what's the main reason that organizations are talking about mobility. This was a really interesting thing. You would think that it would be panic. If I were running a company, it would probably be panic. I'm panicked because I don't have the skills I need, or they're not in the right areas, especially with what we experienced last year. But when we asked this question point blank to organizations, it was really interesting. We got a lot of really different answers. And so as we sort of coded our interviews and started thinking about them with respect to the five models that we saw, we noticed that very specific things that they were trying to do aligned better with one of the models. And so hands down the thing that we heard most was, oh, well, we provide this as an opportunity to retain our employees and engage them a little bit more.

Dani Johnson:
So they're seeing mobility, you know, broadly as a way to engage people more with their work and with the organization so that they can retain them. Other things that we heard was development and skill building. We also heard moving skills to where they're needed in the organization. We heard succession, we did hear succession, particularly in those organizations that focus on a ladder type approach. And then we also heard reinvention and adaptation. So we need to change what we're doing. Therefore, we need people to move around the organization so that we can get there much more quickly. And as this chart shows this was one of the sort of big ahas for us is depending on what you're trying to do, one of these models may be more appropriate for you. And also keep in mind that when we're talking about more appropriate for you, it may not be for the entire organization. It may be for a particular function or a particular specialty.

How are managers and employees being prepared to this new mindset?

Dani Johnson:
Another question, how are managers and employees being prepared to this new mindset? I think the employees are already there. We're talking about mobility, broadly. Employees are already there. Managers have a little bit of a harder time because there tends to be. And we asked this question specifically too. There tends to be talent hoarding. You find a good person and the last thing you want to do is let them be developed and move on to somewhere else in the organization. But we've seen some really interesting things with respect to that. So managers are held accountable for developing their people. And a couple of organizations we talked to that was a prerogative. And so if their people weren't developing and moving onto something else, then they were penalized in some way or they didn't advance as far as they wanted.

Dani Johnson:
We saw bonuses offered for employees that had advanced. And another thing that I thought was really interesting is some organizations just build it into their culture. So I worked at Ford Motor Company for the first part of my career, and one of the things that was very clear is you didn't stay in a role more than two and a half to three years. If you did that, then you were stagnant and you were not very valuable to the organization you were seen as not valuable. And so the movement around the organization is built into the culture and the way that they do things to make sure that mobility continues and is a stable part of, of what they do.

How to align goals with approaches

Dani Johnson:
So, as you can see from this chart, if you're using a ladder type model may be most appropriate if you're trying to develop skills, or if you're working on succession. If you're using a lattice type goal, most of the people that we've talked to, we're doing it for retention and engagement and maybe a little bit development and skills. If you're doing the agency model, the main reason that they had that in place was moving skills to where they're needed in the organization. Outside in the main goal is moving skills to where they're needed and then adaptation. So we saw a lot of people bringing people in from the outside, if they needed those skills very quickly to move their organization in a different direction Then finally reset the main reasons for that and what are moving skills to where they're needed in the organization. And then as well as reinvention and adaptation, we've got all these wonderful people. What do we do with them, if we just tweak their skills a little bit, or if we want to, if they want to develop their skills, they would be a perfect match for this area over here.

How has COVID effected mobility?

Dani Johnson:
All right, let's go on to the next question that was submitted. And again, if you all have questions that you'd like to submit as we go through, feel free. How has COVID affected mobility? This one's a big one. We've been talking about mobility for the last 15 years at least. Guest 1, who actually is on the line here wrote a book at least 20 years ago, probably 25 or 30 years ago. Talking about mobility, how we move people around the organization. Interestingly, I think COVID was like a shock of blue goo. It's a swift spiritual kick to head that changes your reality forever. It was something that was jarring and quick and made people really consider what they were doing in a different light. And so, as I mentioned earlier, it definitely accelerated the technology that we've seen, but it has also accelerated the conversation that we've seen in organizations. So even now as the world, some of the world is starting to get back to normal. These conversations about mobility are continuing and they're continuing in a completely different way. So we're not hearing as much about succession plans. We're hearing much more about hybrid workplaces and what that means for careers. It has fundamentally changed the way that we've addressed mobility, and I think it will continue to mold it and to modify it as we, as we keep on going

Remote mobile teaming, organizational issues, and special attributes of team members

Heather Gilmartin Adams:
Dani, we had a couple of questions come in the Q&A. I can read them for you. First one, remote mobile teaming organizational issues and special attributes of team members. I'll put that in the chat.

Dani Johnson:
I'm going to just open it up so I can see it remote mobile teaming, organizational issues, and special attributes of team members. Yeah. one of the outcomes, and I think it was sort of a subset of mobility before, but one of the outcomes of having more information about skills and having more availability of mobility, if that makes sense, as an open mindset to people moving around the organization is the ability to create teams differently than we have in the past. So before we created the teams that were permanent and recreated them in a way that was basically I don't want to say static, but it was basically based on what we know you can do based on a role that you've had before, but because of the way COVID happened. And because we've had to think about people and their skills, not necessarily people and their roles, some of the organizational issues around putting team members together has, has changed drastically.

Dani Johnson:
The other thing that I think is really interesting is as the world went mobile, as you know, we figured out how to do everything online. Teams can be created that are not cold located anymore, and that's not news for our team. We've been mobile for, I've been mobile for 15 years and love it. We'll never trade it in. But we've had to figure out how to work with people over long distances. And we have the technology to do that. It's just that there has been a lot of discomfort with it. And as sort of COVID hit us and as we continue to figure out what we're going to do next, some of those challenges have gone away. And so it's much easier to build and maintain mobile teams. And it's also much easier to create them.

How does work from home impact career mobility and should it?

Dani Johnson:
All right, I've got the Q&A open Heather, so I'll just hit the next question. How does work from home impact career mobility and should it. I don't think it should. I mean, there are certain circumstances and certain jobs that obviously have to be done at work. I don't want my surgeon to work from home. But there are many jobs that we didn't think could be mobile that absolutely can be mobile. And so I think the world has sort of mostly shifted to that. I still talk to organizations that are like, Oh, I can't wait until we get, can get everybody back in the office. But if you look at some of the big tech companies, for example, they're like, yeah, we're gonna make this, you know, standard forever. Or we're at least going to look at a hybrid model to figure out, you know, how we can continue this.

Dani Johnson:
I read a really interesting article the other day on, and I will, I will find the link and put it in the readout for this. But it basically said, you know, career mobility is going to be hurt because people are going to continue to work from home. They can't build the networks that they need, they don't get the face time they need. There are these concerns, but I think the last year has taught us how to overcome them. And so if organizations are dedicated to institutionalizing those things, I think they're very easy to get around and we can continue to think about career mobility differently. Again, obviously there are things that we need to do face-to-face, but I think at the least a lot of the jobs that we've always considered in office jobs can be done in a hybrid model.

How do orgs know which approach to use

Dani Johnson:
And the next question, managers are supposed to be coaches, managers, think they're doing this. Employees don't agree. Do you see this gap? Oh, wow. This is a question for probably a different roundtable we're actually doing. So we just barely kicked off a topic on coaches and skills actually. And I think it kind of combines those two things. Managers definitely are supposed to be coaches. I think that's gotten a little bit more complicated as people have started to work from home. It's definitely a gap. I'm not sure how much of it has to do with mobility though. I think it has more to do with probably culture. Why don't you contact me separately? We're just starting this this research on coaching. And I would love to sort of get your thoughts. You obviously have some things to say about this.

Dani Johnson:
I just want to read a couple of things from the chat. The first thing managers need to be to do, to be better coaches and shut up and listen more. It's good advice. Many managers think they're coaching when they're actually just giving advice. That is absolutely true.

How do orgs know which approach to use

Dani Johnson:
Okay. So let's go onto the next question. How do organizations know which approach to use. Kind of based on the slide a few before? I think it takes a little bit of searching.

Dani Johnson:
There's no right answer, I guess is what I'm saying here, what we found and what we were hoping to find is that there was a right answer. You know, this mobility model is going to work for you in this circumstance. What we found was that's not true. The closest we could get was the graph that you're seeing right here, which is the majority of organizations that we talked to, who are doing things in this way, tend to be doing it for these reasons. And this is very logical, but we've also talked to many organizations that are doing things completely differently because they have to, for regulatory reasons, for example, or because their people are in a different part of the world or whatever it is. And so how do you figure out which one is the right one for you? You do a lot of questioning and a lot of asking of both the business leaders and what they need, but also the employees and what they need.

Dani Johnson:
And then you have to figure out exactly what your business goals are and how, what you do is going to affect those business goals. So for example, if retention is really big thing, because talent is really important to you, then putting something into place that may be a little bit more flexible is going to be really important. So it's a lattice model. If you're lacking the skills that you need, you've got a couple of options to kind of figure out what you're going to do. You could use an agency model and open up your structure so that you can move people around a little bit more. If you can use an outside in model, which is basically borrowing talent, or you, can you move people from one part of the organization to another, on a more permanent basis. So I think it really depends on what you're trying to accomplish. And it takes a lot of soul searching and a lot of conversations to make sure that you've got it right. Also, as I mentioned a little bit earlier, it isn't necessarily to define a mobility strategy for your entire organization. Different organizations have different needs. A sales department may have very different goals than our research and development department. And so figuring out what those are and developing a local mobility strategy is useful to a lot of the organizations that we talk to.

Approaches in relationship

Dani Johnson:
Okay. All right. So I want to talk a little bit about this with respect to the question that was just asked as well. So when we put these five models on a two by two, what we figured out is that there are basically four things to consider two things to consider with two things to consider. The first one is the question is, are you working with roles or are you working with skills? So a lot of organizations that we're talking to are still really focused on the role, and that's not a bad thing, it's just a thing. So moving people from one role to the next role is how they organize the work in their organization. The other end of that spectrum is some organizations are starting to talk about skills. Some people have been there for years, but more organizations are starting to talk about skills.

Dani Johnson:
We move the people around the work. So the agency model, for examples, moves the people around with the work. Here's a piece of work that needs to be done. We can organize the people around that. Whereas if you're working in a role structure, then you're moving the work around the people. This is the structure we have in place, and we're putting the work in one end and it's going down the conveyor belt and at the end it's done. So that's the first question. The other question is low employee ownership or high employee ownership. Do you, or can you offer your employees a lot of ownership in their own careers or are you in a really structured industry or is expertise in a certain deep expertise in an area super important. And so the employee ownership isn't necessarily as high.

Dani Johnson:
And the other end of that spectrum is obviously high employee ownership. So the low employee ownership may be things like surgery. You don't want your surgeon to spend, you know, a rotation in the marketing department necessarily, unless, unless they're gonna build their career in that way. And so figuring out what you need and what your organization needs is basically based on these two questions, are we worried about roles? Are we worried about skills and how much flexibility can we offer our employees when it comes to their career? There is, there are definitely some industries and careers that you sort of start in, and that's kind of what you're going to do. Doctors, CPAs, those types of things to develop deep expertise. And so the employee ownership of where am I going to go, and what am I going to do is not as important in a lot of organizations where we're seeing more and more of these organizations.

Dani Johnson:
High employee ownership is definitely a thing because they want to keep their people engaged. So chat speaker 2 says organizations like Accenture and Fuel 50, have created talent mobility channels that leave far beyond the enterprise. Do you see this inside out and potentially act inside like a sabbatical as a trend? I think this is a really interesting question. And we also, we almost included an inside out model in the approaches to relationship. We saw a bunch of organizations that are doing exactly that they're doing inside out. The one place that we saw that made just a ton of sense is, you know, these big law firms that bring in brand new law graduates, what they do is they, you know, lend them to the DA's office for a couple of years. So they get lots and lots of trial experience. And it also helps the DA out.

Dani Johnson:
So it's a mutually beneficial agreement, but it's an inside out, we're taking these skills and we're lending them to somebody else. And then we're getting the benefit back into our organization. Another place that we're seeing is there's actually a group of companies in the Southern part of the US that are doing this. They're actually trading amongst themselves. We see this in supply chains quite a bit. So for example, I worked in automotive. We saw people that worked for one of the big three, for example, do a rotation in one of the suppliers and as a part of that chain to get more expertise on what they were doing, but also to borrow the talent to that, to build the relationship and make it stronger and make the work a little bit easier. So I definitely think it's an interesting place to place to go. That the reason that we didn't include it here is because most of the time when we see that it's for development purposes only, so it's not necessarily a career move on the part of the organization. They're not trying to do anything except build those skills in more depth. But when I think it's a really, really, really interesting question.

Owning your career

Heather Gilmartin Adams:
Chat speaker 1 just made the comment that every company website says you own your career, but very few teach employees how to own their career or provide the support that's needed to help them to, to enable them to own their careers.

Dani Johnson:
Yeah. This is actually one thing that we saw five years ago when we did this research. Chat speaker 1 is absolutely right. So the talent acquisition department is the sales arm of the organization for getting employees into the company. And they're like, yes, we develop people away. You know, we want you to have all these great experiences. And then they come in the door and work has to get done. And so managers don't necessarily focus on it and there isn't good information out there. And you know, the opportunities that you're given for learning are basically to do your job better and to make sure that the company is compliant. And so the the ball gets dropped between the vision, which talent acquisition sets and the reality. We've seen that kind of shift as well. We're seeing a little bit more interesting solutions to that one organization that we talked to basically said, Hey, we have, we have 10,000 employees and you're likely not going to be CEO, sorry, but what we can do is we can build this relationship with you and give you opportunities to develop and grow.

Dani Johnson:
And as long as this is a mutually beneficial relationship for both of us, let's continue it. And when it's not, Hey, let's stay friends because maybe you can recommend somebody to us, or maybe we can put you somewhere where you want to be. And so thinking outside the boundaries of the organization tends to be the way that, that we're kind of hurdling that it's not so much. My dad worked for the same company for 35 years and got the gold watch. That's none of us, that's not going to be us. And so we have to figure out as organizations, how to let go of that and, and make the boundaries of our organizations a little bit and more flexible.

What's the relationship between skills & mobility?

Dani Johnson:
Okay. Any other questions here? Okay. I think we have one more question. What's between skills and mobility. This is also a very good question. We addressed it a little bit earlier. There connected, in both of the roundtables that we did for mobility, it was very clear that you couldn't talk about mobility without talking about skills. Even if you're in a very traditional ladder type organization, how you move up through, the ranks is based on the skills that you develop and how useful you are to get to that organization. And so mobility and skills are linked like crazy. And the really cool thing that we're seeing is some of this technology is enabling us to get a much better view of what skills people have. Not just the classes that they've taken, but we have a much better view of what people are doing in their free time.

Dani Johnson:
And a lot of organizations are looking into things like, you know, how much of your posting on GitHub and you know, how elegant is your code that I can see that's already out there. People are using LinkedIn profiles to get a better sense of what skills are one organization that we talked to. It was a vendor working with a healthcare organization. This is one of my favorite examples is they actually tap into the system that does the medical coding to see how many times nurses are performing certain things. And they attribute that to the, to how skilled that nurses. And so it's not just, you know, rate yourself on a scale from one to five anymore, or using some really different ways of determining what those skills are. And a lot of it the Holy grail, in my opinion, is figuring out what people are actually doing inside and outside of their work lives to, to develop those skills.

Dani Johnson:
A lot of people have leadership opportunities in their private lives, for example, for nonprofits or community areas that aren't necessarily taken into account when we make decisions about mobility. But those things are starting to be surfaced. Employees are recognizing that it helps them if the organization understands what their skills are and organizations are understanding that there's all kinds of information out there that they don't have that could, that could help them find, you know, just a gem of a person for a particular role or opportunity within the organization, if they would just open their minds to accepting more of this kind of data. Any other questions on that?

Heather Gilmartin Adams:
We had a clarification question about, Dani are you using skills as inclusive of skills capability and experiences.

Dani Johnson:
We just barely had this conversation yesterday, internally skills is interesting. I have sat on the conversation of skills for four years and not written anything until recently because it's just a mess. It's a complete mess. Nobody understands the difference between skills and capabilities or competencies. Everybody defines them differently. Some people have competency models and skills models. Heather actually did a report on this earlier that a study on this earlier this year if you want to read kind of what we found in the literature and how we sort of solidified it in our heads, skills is oftentimes seen as more granular than, than competencies. Capabilities are generally used to describe what an organization can do and not what an individual can do. And experiences are generally used to develop skills, to develop skills or as proof that you have that skill. So that's probably how I would define those three things plus competencies. But again, depending on the organization, you're in the nomenclature could be completely different. But that's how we're defining it currently.

Conclusion

Dani Johnson:
Any other questions? Okay. for more information on the research that we talked about here feel free to jump on our website. We have a couple of things that are available to everybody, and then a couple of things that are available to our members. We did a premise and a pretty deep lit review on this. We also did an infographic that's available to everybody. And then that report is available to members. And as always, if any of you have any questions, please feel free to contact us directly. We love talking. We love people challenging what we talk about, because it helps make us better. One more question, where does psychological safety fit? Probably another study. So again, we've got a couple of studies. I mentioned that the talk about psychological safety it's part of our responsiveness research, and it's also part of our diversity and inclusion stuff. So we can point you to anything in our library with respect to that. Right. I think that's it. Thank you everybody for joining. And we'll talk to you next time.

 

Written by

Dani Johnson

Dani is Co-founder and Principal Analyst for RedThread Research. She has spent the majority of her career writing about, conducting research in, and consulting on human capital practices and technology. Her ideas can be found in publications such as Wall Street Journal, CLO Magazine, HR Magazine, and Employment Relations. Dani holds an MBA and an MS and BS in Mechanical Engineering from BYU.

Share This